2022 March Tan Time Trial Results

/2022 March Tan Time Trial Results

 

 

President’s Tan Talk –  Mar 2022

Forecasts of potentially heavy rain saw a smaller than usual crowd at the March Tan Time Trial. Clearly the Bureau of Meteorology (and some of our members) forgot that it virtually never rains during the Tan Time Trial, a total of about three times since the 1980’s in my recollection, that’s less than one in a hundred!! Before the Tan, or after the Tan, but almost never during the Tan!! And as it happened, we welcomed a first-timer, all the way from Hong Kong.

Two significant milestones were celebrated, Kim Owens 250 TTT’s (actually run in February), before being sidelined with an injury, and Ian Godfrey 300 TTT’s, both sensational achievements over more than twenty years, big congratulations to both, see photos below.

Members were reminded that due to a clash of runs the April TTT would start and finish around in Birdwood Avenue, opposite the Shrine, where we used to start finish years back.

Anniversary Dinner

We are looking to hold our 40th Anniversary Dinner later in the year, as our ‘birthday’ is in early November. We will provide more details in the coming months.

A big thank you as ever to our volunteers for their great work. Although we might make it all look effortless, it isn’t, so many thanks.

Happy running,
Michael
VRR President

VRR Achievement Awards

 

Kim Owens achieved 250 TTT’s
Congratulations, Kim

Ian Godfrey achieved 300 TTT’s
Congratulations, Ian

VRR Running Reflections

(As part of VRR’s 40th birthday celebrations in 2022, we are encouraging members (both new & old) to share what running means to them.)

VRR Member,Chris Grafen reflects on his introduction to running.
I am a bit of a ‘late bloomer’ as far as distance running is concerned, having almost fallen into running accidentally.Sure, my uncle (Jim Crawford) was the first Australian to run one hundred marathons, a milestone he achieved in the early 1980’s, but all that Jim’s running did for me back then was to inspire me to try to ‘out do’ him by cycling my Gitane racing bike all the way to Adelaide on three occasions and once to Sydney at the tender ages of 15 and 16. Years later, I just missed out on running a sub-3 hour marathon, but one thing that I can claim is

 

that, after taking six or seven days to ride ‘against the wind’ to Adelaide via Mildura and later the Great Ocean Road, I did eventually do a sub-3 day Adelaide to Melbourne ride (2 days, 17 hours) ‘with the wind’ via the shortest possible route from GPO to GPO via Bordertown and Horsham.

I eventually sold my racer to buy my first motorbike before turning 18 and did very little in the way of exercise for many years. It was only after moving into a share house in North Sydney in 1993 that the 11 year hiatus was broken, but not with any pre-conceived intention. I had enlisted with four others to do a year of volunteer work in inner Sydney and, as I had been commissioned to work two days a week with struggling migrant and refugee kids in an inner-city primary school, I found that my finishing times were considerably earlier than my housemates whose placements were more like a conventional 9 to 5 arrangement. One afternoon, I arrived home around 4pm and felt a sudden urge to go for a jog along nearby Military Road to see where it went. Well, with daylight savings on my side, I soon reached the Spit Bridge and realised that if I could keep it going a bit longer, I would eventually hit the sea at Manly. Without even knowing it, I had completed my very first City to Surf, albeit on the opposite side of the Harbour to the official route. The running seeds had been sown!

A few months later, I entered myself into ‘Group C’ (for the gorilla suits, clowns and those expecting to run the 14km’s in 120+ minutes, if I recall correctly) of a real City to Surf. I remember wearing a pair of very tight nylon Aussie Rules shorts and a pair of ex-Army Reserve Dunlop K2’s or something. I got to the end in a respectable 86 minutes, but then experienced a profound stinging and realised that I had blood dripping down the inside of both legs. The first aid tent scolded me for not applying Vaseline pre-race ‘wherever there’s friction’ and also advised to never run again in nylon AFL shorts – possibly the best running advise I was ever given.

I managed to get my City to Surf time down to 72 minutes a couple of years later and, in my capacity as Warden of Residential Halls at Wollongong University, in 1996 entered the largest team (193 student runners) in that year’s race. It was such a big event for our cohort that Channel Nine’s local news even did a feature story on our team. That same year, I attempted my first half marathon (1.51) and, three months later and quite underdone, my first full marathon (5.19).

Returning to Melbourne in 1997, I kept the running bug alive by doing my first Melbourne Marathon. After achieving Spartan status with ten years of marathon times either side of four hours, I made a decision in 2007 to introduce some weekly racing and time trials into my training – facilitated by joining Victorian Road Runners and Glen Eira Masters – and saw immediate dividends, dropping to 3.13 in 2008 and a PB of 3.03 in 2009 – I even qualified for Boston and did a 3.16 there in 2010.

It would have been nice to have broken three hours for the marathon, but one kind Road Runner a few years ago informed me that, in fact, I had – or at least would have, had the Royal Family’s desire to watch the Marathon start from the balcony at Windsor Castle not caused the marathon length to increase from 40 k’s to 42.2 k’s at the first London Olympics. He pointed out, furthermore, that my 3.03 time for 42.2 k’s would have seen me crossing the 40k finishing post a few minutes ahead of the winner’s 2.58 at the 1896 Athens Games – although I suppose  Spyridon Louis’s runners were more akin to Roman sandles than the high tech shoes we wear today.

 

Chris is the owner/operator of Highland Explorer Tours.
This photo shows him in the High Country ‘at work in the office’.
One of his favourite ‘training grounds’.

 

Peter Nicoll talking about all those great years.

Over 42 years ago I decided that fun running was a good way of keeping slightly fit after I gave up not too serious football.
I discussed it with a friend of mine at work and we both entered our first fun run, with no training – it was the 1980 Big M Melbourne marathon from Frankston to Melbourne. We envisaged that we might get half way.
Along the way we came across a runner who seemingly was in some trouble and I asked if he was OK and he said he had just come out of hospital on the day

 

before and was determined to finish. We stopped at a drink station and never saw him again.
About the half way mark I said to Terry my friend, I think I can finish this and we did, very, very painfully, but we did.
That was the first of my 16 Melbourne marathons and I with many others at VRR are proud Spartans (10 Melbourne marathons).
Both Adri Leening (another Spartan) and myself joined the VRR shortly after, around 1983, and competed in many fun runs around the country, never breaking any records but enjoying the involvement with the other runners.
On one occasion Adri and I went down to Point Lonsdale to do the Rip to River which is or was along the sand, rocks and water from Point Lonsdale to Barwon Heads – a distance as I remember about 14 K.
When we arrived near the start, I noticed Cliff Young and I remarked to Adri that at least there was somebody in the run that we could beat.
Cliff arrived at the finish over 30 minutes before we staggered in – so much for the Cliffy shuffle.
As a mad Richmond supporter, I was most impressed to see Jim Jess at a Port Fairy run.  I’d watched Jim play for many years and by this time he was in his thirties and by my reckoning was never fast even years before, but once again I was cleaned up, this time by a Ghost.
Finally, I must mention again the time that the late Gordon Burrowes (commonly confused with Father Christmas) was doing the VRR Saturday tan and I caught up with him when he was really struggling.
I said, Gordon are you OK and he muttered something about the Anderson Street hill. On further questioning he stated that he was going so slowly up the hill that he was passed by a lady wearing high heels
It has been such a pleasure being a member of VRR, a great club for so long, may it keep going for many years to come.

 

Peter (blue t shirt #6185) at the 1980 Big M marathon

 

Peter (right) after the 1985 marathon with Adri Leening

 

Rehydration and recovery after a City to Surf (maybe 1986) with four Spartans
Back Row L-R Peter Nicoll SO223, Adri Leening SO476, Frank Helmer
Front Row L-R Jane Surzacker SF0052, Gordon Burrowes SO525, Eileen Helmer
 

My own (Graham Prossor) contribution to Running Reflections.
This is actually a reprint of an article that was published in Stride Out back in 2010 but it still resonates with me even to this day.That first marathon…Within the VRR there are many marathon stories that members can relate, but I believe that there’d be universal agreement, that the one marathon that really sticks in your memory is that first marathon.

 

In my case I was a marathon sceptic. During 1994 as a 39 year old,  I had started to develop my interest in running. Graduating from the lunch time run around Albert Park Lake with my work colleagues, to the Saturday morning lake run with Kevin Browne & Co.
In those days the Saturday morning run was a little quicker than it is today.
I had run some 10km races and even a few half marathons, but one view that was absolutely ‘rock solid’ was that I would NEVER run a marathon.
As they say, ‘never say never’ and by early 1995 that resolve had evaporated, I mean, how hard can it be?
One Saturday morning the announcement was made – I had entered the Canberra Marathon to be held in April of that year.
As many VRR members would be aware, Kevin ‘The Professor’ Browne is immensely knowledgeable about marathons and is always prepared to share that knowledge.
Consequently, I entered that Canberra race knowing all there was to know about running a marathon. I could’ve written a book on the subject at that time – pacing, endurance, speed ‘The Professor’ had imparted every bit of his knowledge.
To set the scene, the Canberra marathon also doubles as the ACT & NSW Masters marathon and consequently all runners in the masters age group run with age category numbers pinned to their backs.
This is great, as it allows you to spot similarly aged runners and compare your progress during the race.
After the first couple of kilometers, I noticed a runner in the 60-65 age bracket a little ahead and decided that he would be a perfect pace setter and so positioned myself a metre or so behind him.
We went through the half way point in 92 minutes, that was a half marathon PB for me and I can recall having the thought that if I can pick up the pace a little in the second half, I might even be able to break through the sub 3 hour marathon barrier  – and on my first attempt, how good would that be?
Shortly after the half way point, I started to feel a little tired……
My pace setter continued on at the same steady pace and because the Canberra course has a number of loops you often pass runners coming back towards you and can gauge if you are gaining or losing on them – I was rapidly losing my pacesetter.
For all I know, he never changed his pace until the finish.
As the kilometers clicked by, my pace got slower and slower – all those people who had been ages behind on each of the loops, now started to drift by.
Inside the final kilometer and my legs started to cramp up. I would stop and stretch one leg and start jogging again (Thoughts of Prof. Browne # 5  – a slow jog is faster than a walk) only to have the other leg cramp after 20 or 30 metres – more people are drifting by me.
The final turn and there’s the finish line up ahead.
As it turned out, the time of 3hrs 30 minutes 36 seconds was quite respectable, but as I told Kevin when I saw him after the race, that was THE HARDEST THING I HAVE EVER DONE IN MY LIFE – he laughed his head off.
Of course I resolved never to compete in another marathon, but by next April I was back in Canberra, and in fact ended up with 10 Canberra’s, a few Melbourne’s, a Gold Coast and a Sydney.
Although you might end up running a few marathons in your running career, the one that will stick in your memory is, that first marathon…..

 

The finish of ‘That first Marathon’.
Birthdays
VRR extends birthday greetings to the following members who will celebrate birthdays in March
Eileen H, Peter S, Brian T, Ken M, Bill R, Rod O, Tarquin O, Greig McE, Kevin H, Rob C, Susan W, Leigh F, Kevin A, Andrew L, Paul D, Monish S, Peter L, Evan K
John C, John H, Maggie A, Paul T, Adam B
Virtual Tans: When can we run one?

The committee has decided that in the future “virtual tans” can only be completed if the club is not permitted to hold the official Tan on the first Saturday of the month at the Tan track  due to DHHS Covid 19 restrictions.

 QR code
Also, it is essential that all members check in using the QR code. If you are unable to use the code please ensure you register manually. If you do not check in, your time will be recorded. If you bring along a friend or relative who is not a member can you please check in for them or make sure they check in.

The QR code is on display at each tan and is on Facebook.
Thanks.
The committee.

Note that the following VRR Fun Runs are now confirmed (assuming no further lockdowns)

REMEMBER to bring your OWN drink bottle to all VRR events

CHANGE OF START LOCATION FOR APRIL TTT 
(note that the March TTT will start from the usual location)

The Tan Time Trial on Saturday 2 April 2022 will start opposite the Shrine on Linlithgow Avenue near to the Old Melbourne Observatory. This is due to another event being held at the Tan on the same day. Please note that paid parking applies in this area (free parking is available on the other side of Government House Drive).

CHANGE OF START LOCATION FOR APRIL TTT 
(note that the March TTT will start from the usual location)The Tan Time Trial on Saturday 2 April 2022 will start opposite the Shrine on Linlithgow Avenue near to the Old Melbourne Observatory. This is due to another event being held at the Tan on the same day. Please note that paid parking applies in this area (free parking is available on the other side of Government House Drive).ANNUAL DINNER IMPORTANT NOTICE
Due to the current Covid situation the committee has decided to postpone the dinner until later in the year. Possibly some time in October/November. Hopefully by that time things on the Covid front will be much better.ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
In terms of the clubs rules the Annual General Meeting is to be held at 8.30am on Saturday, 2nd April 2022 after the Tan subject to any Covid 19 restrictions.

The purpose of the meeting is to:

  1. to confirm the minutes of the previous Annual General Meeting.
  2. to receive from the committee reports about the previous financial year.
  3. to elect officers and the ordinary members of the committee.

to receive and consider the financial statements for the previous financial year.
Doug Stokes

REMINDER 
The committee has decided that in the future “virtual tans” can only be completed if the club is not permitted to hold the official Tan on the first Saturday of the month at the Tan track  due to DHHS Covid 19 restrictions.

Also, it is essential that all members check in using the QR code. If you are unable to use the code please ensure you register manually. If you do not check in, your time will not be recorded. If you bring along a friend or relative who is not a member can you please check in for them or make sure they check in.

Additionally, there will be no membership renewal fee for next year.
Doug will send out a “receipt’ as a further reminder in the coming weeks.
Thanks.
VRR Committee.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
In terms of the clubs rules the Annual General Meeting is to be held at 8.30am on Saturday, 2nd April 2022 after the Tan subject to any Covid 19 restrictions.

The purpose of the meeting is to:

  1. to confirm the minutes of the previous Annual General Meeting.
  2. to receive from the committee reports about the previous financial year.
  3. to elect officers and the ordinary members of the committee.

to receive and consider the financial statements for the previous financial year.
Doug Stokes

  And just for the Dad’s….
Why was the runner in the marathon stopped and taken to jail?
He was resisting a rest.
What do runners eat before a big race?
Fast food. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TOP 4km RUNNERS

Position Member Run Time
1 Kevin Armstrong 4km 22.12
2 Brian O'Dea 4km 22.54
3 Nick Main 4km 23.50

TOP 8KM RUNNERS

Position Member Run Time
1 Adam Barker 8km 29.33
2 Lucy Oehr 8km 34.56
3 Malcolm Mackam 8km 37.01

Download Results

4km
8km

2022-03-17T10:55:10+00:00March 17th, 2022|